A lesson in public relations coverup of disease outbreaks from the sewage industry and federal agencies.

The disease outbreaks associated with E. coli contaminated produce from the Salinas Valley, California farms irrigated
by
recycled sewage effluent (reclaimed water) has exposed the hidden danger to our food supply  and health.
Generally, these outbreaks have been blamed on food handlers, manure, and foreign produce or unknown sources.

Now, with 76 million foodborne annually and after the spinach, lettuce, and onion outbreaks being blamed on manure,
the American Water and WateReuse Foundation is doing a study which, hopefully,
"will provide practical data for
understanding how microbial regrowth in reclaimed distribution systems alters effluent microbial water
quality - and how to control this regrowth."

American Water and WateReuse Foundation Join Forces to Preserve Nation's Water Supply
Monday November 6, 2006 9:01 am ET  

Companies enter into research partnership, study the biology of reclaimed water

In 1996, EPA, USDA, FDA and Industry funded a National SCIENCE ACADEMY STUDY Use of Reclaimed Water and
Sludge in Food Crop Production.
  While the agencies used the study to claim the use of reclaimed water and sludge/biosolds was
safe, a statement by
the Committee chair stated, " It is hoped that this report will be particularly useful to food processors, states, and
municipalities in assessing the use of treated municipal wastewater and sludge in producing crops for human consumption. It
highlights public concerns and regulatory issues likely to be faced, and also identifies some additional areas for research."

In a review of the study, it was noted that, "The [NSA] NRC Report also discussed the limits of the study which
included: (1) low illness rate, (2) insufficient sensitivity of current techniques to detect low-level disease
transmission, and (3) no way to actually assess exposure levels. These limits were imposed on the study
because diseases from exposure to wastewater were under-reported, scattered, and some
effects may be unrecorded."

Press Release Source: American Water
http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/061106/20061106005730.html?.v=1

American Water and WateReuse Foundation Join Forces to Preserve Nation's Water Supply
Monday November 6, 2006 9:01 am ET  

Companies enter into research partnership, study the biology of reclaimed water


VOORHEES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--American Water, the largest water services provider in North America, today
announced it has signed a contract with The WateReuse Foundation to conduct a joint research project on the
biostability of reclaimed water.
ADVERTISEMENT


The project, titled "Microbiological Quality and Biostability of Reclaimed Water Following Storage and Distribution," will
study the biological components of water in reclaimed water systems, or those where wastewater is treated and reused
for a number of environmental purposes, such as irrigation and grounds maintenance.

"Water is a precious natural resource, and one that is essential to life," said Mark LeChevallier, director of innovation
and environmental stewardship at American Water. "Reclaimed water systems prevent pollution, enhance the
environment and promote sustainability." The American Water-WateReuse Foundation project
will provide practical data
for understanding how microbial regrowth in reclaimed distribution systems alters effluent microbial water quality - and
how to control this regrowth.

Total budget for the 30-month project is $500,335, with $300,000 in funds contributed by The WateReuse Foundation,
and $200,335 of in-kind support from American Water and other participating organizations.

"This is a very significant research project," LeChevallier continued. "The impact of treatment process, disinfection,
storage and system operation will be modelled in a way than can be applied to a wide range of reclaimed water
systems." The end report will document cost-effective strategies to reduce the risks of regrowth in reclaimed water
systems throughout the country.

American Water is dedicated to the development of sustainable solutions to address numerous water challenges facing
the U.S. From infrastructure to rehabilitation, to implementing new compliance regulations and creating new sources of
water, American Water is considered the definitive industry leader.

The WateReuse Foundation is an educational, non-profit public benefit corporation that serves as a centralized
organization for the water and wastewater community to advance the science of water reuse, recycling, reclamation and
desalination.

For more information regarding the American Water-WateReuse Foundation research partnership, please contact Mark
LeChevallier at 856-346-8261, or via email at [email protected]

With headquarters in Voorhees, NJ, American Water employs approximately 7,000 who provide high quality water,
wastewater, and other related services to more than 18 million people in 29 states and Canada. More information can
be found by visiting www.amwater.com.



Contact:
Kimberly Cooper
American Water
T 856-346-8207
M 856-261-9870
[email protected]
or
Emily DiTomo
Buchanan Public Relations
PR for American Water
T 610-649-9292
[email protected]

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